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  • 9 Reviews 2 Helpful
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The Highlife is not at all intended for park use, whereas the DH and the Crush are virtually strictly park/urban boards. If you want a pow board, the Highlife will slay pow. If you want a park board, either the DH or the Crush will blow you away. If you're debating just between the Crush and the DH, consider that the DH is more or less a zero-camber board whereas the Crush is tip and tail rockered. If you want a board that can slay powder and destroy the park, check out the Machete or DH2.

The flex is definitely medium (about a 5 on a 1-10 scale) on the Alphas, and it sounds like they'd be perfect for what you want to do with them. I use mine in the park on big tables and also butter like crazy all over the mountain with them. The highback is much more flat this year which makes it easy to tweak grabs and butter while still maintaining solid response. As for the size, 9's will fit, but you're pretty much going to max out the binding, however, one size up (9-11), and your boots would be swimming in them.

Next level bindings
5 5

Before there were Alpha Movements, I was riding Ride Team bindings, which were some of the best bindings I've ever had the pleasure of using. Since they dropped the Team from their line and adopted the "Movement" series of bindings, I've ridden 4 sets of Alpha Movements, including the first set they put out for the 06/07 season. Each season, Ride has stepped up their game and outdone themselves. The Alpha Movements are all about technological innovation and forward thinking.

Enter the 09/10 Alpha Movement. Technologically superior is the term that comes to mind. The previous season, Ride blew me away by introducing their "thin flex" ankle strap, thankfully, they continued to improve on that strap and made it more durable for the 09/10 Alphas. Lightweight and next level, the thin flex ankle strap makes you feel connected to your board, and it's way more comfortable than bulky over-padded straps anyway. Ride is one step ahead of the game with their toe strap as well. The comfort grip "webbed" toe strap is on point. It works well over the top of your boot, but it really shines when you go over the toe as it conforms to your boot and locks your foot into place. New to the 09/10 Alphas are the wedgie footbeds. It's a simple concept, but leave it to Ride to think of the little things that lead to massive technical improvements in their hardgoods. The wedgies really offer alot of relief for your knees when you pull long days of hard charging the mountain or on deep pow days. And as always, Ride uses aluminum chassis and ratchets, which is especially important for cold Alaskan riding. If you've ever ridden in extreme cold, you know that all of your gear acts differently, and plastic tends to get brittle. As far as flex goes, the Alpha movements are a combination of hard charging response, with just enough lightweight mobility to offer up some flexibility in the park. Oh and did I mention that these are extremely lightweight?

Overall, the Alpha Movements are next level bindings. It's as simple as that. Always lightweight and next gen, the Alpha Movements are a no brainer. Don't waste your time with Burton's whack minimalistic designs for their $400+ bindings that have highbacks that are guaranteed to snap off, or the ridiculous all-plastic approach by other binding manufacturers.

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Superb Park Board
5 5

Preface to this review: I own an 09/10 Crush, however, Ride didn't change anything (except the graphic) from 09/10 to the 10/11 version. As such, I feel this review is still equally relevant. Hope it helps.

I bought a Crush 152 mid-season last season (09/10) because I started riding urban alot more than ever before. I already had a DH 2.2 for my resort/all-mountain/park riding needs, but I felt it necessary to scoop up a Crush for strictly urban and park sessions, and I'm very glad I did.

The Crush is an urban and park destroyer. The lowrize rocker is on point, especially for the Crush's flex pattern. It's buttery, but definitely not overly noodly, and the cleave edges + slimewalls are a must for any urban and park riding. It presses boxes, is stable and catch-free on rails (thanks to the 3 degree edge bevel), and butters/tail-blocks like no other. The lowrize rocker doesn't make this deck too unstable and washy for tables either, I used the Crush for summer camp last season and it held up on the 40 footers. That being said, it isn't ideal for all-mountain use and the stiffer Ride alternatives (i.e. DH 2, Machete) are much better suited for use in the powder as well as all over the rest of the mountain. However, the Crush doesn't mind getting filthy in a little bit of fresh. The lowrize rocker gives you some welcome float and it's just as playful as ever for some calculated all-mountain freestyle use. I'm still using this board for my urban/park sessions and it still kills it.

All in all, the Crush is an excellent choice for park and urban riding and can dabble in a little bit of playful all-mountain and powder situations as well. If you're looking for an all-mountain charger, check out the DH 2 or Machete, but if you're in search of a true park slayer, look no further.

Other helpful information: I'm 5'10", 150 lbs, wear size 10 boots, and always used 09/10 Ride Alpha Movements on this board. My Crush is a 152 regular (non-wide).

2 Comments

Superb Park Board
5 5

I bought a Crush 152 mid-season last season (09/10) because I started riding urban alot more than ever before. I already had a DH 2.2 for my resort/all-mountain/park riding needs, but I felt it necessary to scoop up a Crush for strictly urban and park sessions, and I'm very glad I did.

The Crush is an urban and park destroyer. The lowrize rocker is on point, especially for the Crush's flex pattern. It's buttery, but definitely not overly noodly, and the cleave edges + slimewalls are a must for any urban and park riding. It presses boxes, is stable and catch-free on rails (thanks to the 3 degree edge bevel), and butters/tail-blocks like no other. The lowrize rocker doesn't make this deck too unstable and washy for tables either, I used the Crush for summer camp last season and it held up on the 40 footers. That being said, it isn't ideal for all-mountain use and the stiffer Ride alternatives (i.e. DH 2, Machete) are much better suited for use in the powder as well as all over the rest of the mountain. However, the Crush doesn't mind getting filthy in a little bit of fresh. The lowrize rocker gives you some welcome float and it's just as playful as ever for some calculated all-mountain freestyle use. The Crush didn't change at all (except for the graphic of course) from the 09/10 season to the 10/11 version, so I'm still using this board for my urban/park sessions and it still kills it.

All in all, the Crush is an excellent choice for park and urban riding and can dabble in a little bit of playful all-mountain and powder situations as well. If you're looking for an all-mountain charger, check out the DH 2 or Machete, but if you're in search of a true park slayer, look no further.

Other helpful information: I'm 5'10", 150 lbs, wear size 10 boots, and always used 09/10 Ride Alpha Movements on this board. My Crush is a 152 regular (non-wide).

0 Comments

All mountain destroyer!
5 5

First of all, I picked up my DH2 in early November of 2009, and have since ridden it about 3 or 4 times a week here in the great state of Alaska. I spend most my time riding a combination of all-mountain and park, but also do plenty of backcountry/pow riding along with many urban/jibbing sessions. It is easily the best board I've ever owned.

Most descriptions of the DH2 label it as a park board, and I'm not saying that it doesn't slay the park, but this board is definitely more than capable of ripping the entire mountain. Within the first week of riding my DH 2.2 (the second of the three limited edition graphic releases), I had the pleasure of bringing it out on a 2' pow day.. I was shocked by how much the lowrize rocker made it float out of the deep Alaskan powder. Since then, I've done everything possible on this board, from 3' pow days at Alyeska Resort, to sessioning urban spots around Anchorage and the surrounding areas, and everything in between. The carbon array 5 and pop stixs make the DH2 very snappy and stable, with tons of ollie power, and the lowrize rocker makes the DH2 playful and pressable on boxes and rails. I've literally used this board for every style of riding and it miraculously seems to excel in each discipline, I've done backcountry, all mountain, park, and urban jibbing. It's proven itself to be very durable as well, the cleave edges and slimewalls take abuse like you wouldn't believe. The only complaint I have (and it's a very minor one), is that the top sheet has cracked on either side of the nose of my board (roughly in between the binding inserts and the tip) from being pressed so much in addition to taking various ragdolls and tomahawks. This is purely cosmetic and the cracks only reach about an inch to two inches into my board from the edge. These cracks have not compromised the integrity of the board in any way. If you're looking for a noodly board to be used strictly for urban and park, you may want to check out the Ride Crush, but if you're looking for an incredible park board that can also slay powder and hold it's own on the rest of the mountain, look no further. I highly recommend the Ride DH2.

Also, for sizing references, I'm 5'10", 150 lbs, wear a size 10 32 Lashed, use Ride Alpha Movements in size 9-11, and have the DH 2.2 in a 155 regular. Hope this helps.

0 Comments

I'm debating between a 152 Crush and a 152 K2 WWW Rocker for my strictly park and urban shred stick. I already have a 155 DH2 for my all mountain needs and a 161.5 T-Rice C2 Power Banana for my pow slayer. I'm basically looking for a pretty noodly board to press out on rails and boxes but also be functional on tables and hips and some limited all mountain use. What should I go with?
P.S. I wear a size 10 32 Lashed.

1 Answers

I'm debating between a 152 WWW Rocker and a 152 Ride Crush for my strictly park and urban shred stick. I already have a 155 Ride DH2 for my all mountain needs and a 161.5 T-Rice C2 Power Banana for my pow slayer. I'm basically looking for a pretty noodly board to press out on rails and boxes but also be functional on tables and hips and some limited all mountain use. What should I go with?
P.S. I wear a size 10 32 Lashed.

2 Answers

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