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4 5

The board makes for spectacular freeriding, but there seem to be durability issues with this snowboard for this year.

The sidewall is made of this clear material that seems to crack under a combination of cold weather and high stress. After this, the board will start to delaminate in this area. Another issue is that the diecut base may tear off, for seemingly no reason.

Nitro honored their warranty.

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5 5

I've been riding this snowboard for the better part of this winter season, putting about 20 to 30 days on it. It has seen action in Baker-Snoqualmie, the Tetons, and all over the 'Ice Coast'. The verdict? It will handle just about anything you can expect it to. It is definitely not a jib board (but sometimes I can't resist), so try to avoid bonking rocks and steel posts because the tip and the tail are thin, soft, and light. Where it absolutely excels: SPEED, carves/turns, drops, jumps, steeps, powder (decent flotation; I am 155# and ride the 157cm), etc. It's rock solid and returns a smooth, damp ride that just makes you want to go faster, jump further, rip harder. If you love technical terrain, airs, freeriding, etc., you'll probably love this board.

Notes about the board: base loves wax, it's pretty light, mid-wide, mid-stiff.

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4 5

I haven't been on this deck yet because it's June and there's no snow for thousands of miles from me. But I can still tell you a few things: 1. It is surprisingly light. The 157cm is much lighter than a 155cm Ride DH or a 155cm Arbor Wasteland. A lot of companies claim a have a thinned tip and tail, but Nitro takes it a step further: there's little in the way of material at the very tip and tail and it's very soft at the ends. The board itself seems to be mid-stiff, but I've yet to ride it and break it in. Will review again when winter comes.

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4 5

You can't go wrong with these bindings. Relatively lightweight, enough flex for rails and tweaks in the park and enough response to power you around the mountain, instead of getting kicked around by choppy snow. Nice footbed with LOTS of padding for landing those jumps on hardpack. Not the most adjustable, but adjustable enough to fit most boots. Really, just go for it.

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5 5

Salomon did a great job with the F22. I've been riding F22s for the last three years and have gone through two pairs. If the shape of the boot fits your foot, these are the most comfortable boots you are likely to put on. Low profile helps reduce toe drag, the boot is fairly warm, and the lacing system is quick. The F22 takes a few riding days to break in (it is initially quite stiff and may be hard on your calves), and this results in a delicious mid-flex boot that you can use in steeps, off cliffs, on rails... anything! Tightening the laces makes the boot quite stiff, but also cuts off my circulation.

There is just one thing I don't like about the F22s: durability. My latest pair started to fold and buckle around the ankle after about 30 days of riding. Pretty pathetic. My Salomon Malamutes have the bulk of two seasons on them and are still going strong. It might have something to do with the Fusion liner. Anyway, this always seems to happen just as the warranty runs out (1 year).

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3 5

These bindings are light, soft and good for the park (especially for jibs, ok on jumps, big jumps on hardpack are questionable.) They make are a decent choice for beginners, too. The Missions are comfortable but don't provide enough support or response to be an all-mountain binding for high-intermediate riders or above. Fits Salomon Fusion boots well.

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